Home : Media : News : Saved News Module

Surface Combat Systems Community Officially Opens New High-Fidelity Trainer

By By Kimberly M. Lansdale, Center for Surface Combat Systems Public Affairs | Dec. 11, 2018

SAN DIEGO (NNS) -- The Center for Surface Combat Systems (CSCS) hosted a ribbon cutting ceremony for the Combined Integrated Air and Missile Defense (IAMD)/Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW) Trainer (CIAT), onboard Naval Base San Diego (NBSD), Dec. 6.   

The guest speaker for this significant event was Vice Adm. Richard Brown, commander, Naval Surface Forces. 

“This trainer allows us to continue to create a culture of excellence within the Surface Force by providing an environment where we can realistically recreate the high-end tactical training needed to build lethality, warfighting, and tactical proficiency,” said Brown. “CIAT allows watch teams to practice standard operating procedures, tactics, techniques, and procedures, and pre-planned responses in a simulator with capabilities unlike any other in the fleet.”

Brown also highlighted CIAT’s advanced capabilities and how it will positively impact the future of surface combat systems training for years to come.

“This trainer has the capability for teams to practice using Naval Integrated Fire Control, constructive aviation, simulated Link 16, integrated electronic warfare, soft kill, and advanced anti-submarine warfare target, propagation and sensor models – warfare areas and technology we have not been able to effectively train with, unless onboard a ship underway,” Brown explained. 

Rear Adm. Ronald Boxall, director, Surface Warfare (OPNAV N96), was also a key participant. As CSCS’ resource sponsor, OPNAV N96 provided the funding for CIAT.  

The host of the ceremony was Capt. Frank X. Castellano, CSCS’ commanding officer. He outlined CSCS’ essential role in the surface combat systems community and the team approach that has resulted in the very successful unveiling of this cutting edge trainer. 

Castellano also stressed the importance of the relationship between CSCS and Naval Sea Systems Command’s Surface Ship Training Systems Program Office (PMS 339) in making CIAT a reality. The CIAT provides a realistic, high fidelity, virtual trainer for the AEGIS Combat System. The team that executed the delivery included PMS 339, CSCS, Naval Surface Warfare Center Carderock Division, Naval Surface Warfare Center Dahlgren Division, Naval Undersea Warfare Center, and industry partners. The Navy’s decision to have a government team develop the high fidelity, virtual trainer created efficiencies in training system development. The CIAT will allow Sailors to master the weapons systems with which they will fight the ship, and allow training to keep pace with tactical system modernization. 

“Capt. Samuel Pennington, PMS 339’s program manager, who is also on stage with me today, and his staff, started this journey with CSCS and our relationship has only strengthened over the years as we worked together to bring CIAT online,” he explained. “Without the synergy of this relationship, this trainer may not have happened.” 

When Brown, Boxall, Castellano, and Pennington cut the ribbon officially opening CIAT, the Navy witnessed another milestone in surface combat systems training. 

“The quality and fidelity of this training system is an unmatched capability in the Surface Force,” Brown said. “This trainer will serve to enhance the proficiencies of Sailors across the waterfront in creating a culture of excellence, ultimately preparing our warfighters to own the fight.”

CSCS' mission is to develop and deliver surface ship combat systems training to achieve surface warfare superiority. CSCS headquarters' staff oversees 14 learning sites and detachments located throughout the continental United States, Hawaii, and Japan and manages and operates a Naval Education and Training Command (NETC) training division in Rota, Spain. CSCS provides over 538 courses, awards 114 different Navy Enlisted Classifications (NECs), and trains over 38,000 Sailors a year. CSCS delivers specialized training for officer and enlisted sailors to tactically operate, maintain, and employ shipboard and shore-based weapons, sensors, and command and control systems utilized in today's Navy.