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IMAGE: CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. - University of Virginia students investigate material properties with a microscope. The students and their professors teamed up with Naval Surface Warfare Center Dahlgren Division (NSWCDD) engineers and scientists through the Naval Engineering Education Consortium (NEEC) to develop a better understanding of the capabilities and limitations of additive manufacturing (3D printing).  "The research that the University of Virginia is conducting is an important examination of the microstructure and mechanical properties of alloys relevant to the Navy produced by state of the art additive manufacturing techniques," said Ricky Moore, an NSWCDD engineer and mentor to the students. "Understanding these properties is paramount as the Navy begins to design, develop, produce, and field components and systems produced with additive manufacturing to improve performance and availability of systems in the Fleet. Without it, much of the promise of additive manufacturing will be out of reach."
180312-N-XXXXX-001.JPG Photo By: U.S. Navy

University of Virginia - CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. - University of Virginia students investigate material properties with a microscope. The students and their professors teamed up with Naval Surface Warfare Center Dahlgren Division (NSWCDD) engineers and scientists through the Naval Engineering Education Consortium (NEEC) to develop a better understanding of the capabilities and limitations of additive manufacturing (3D printing). "The research that the University of Virginia is conducting is an important examination of the microstructure and mechanical properties of alloys relevant to the Navy produced by state of the art additive manufacturing techniques," said Ricky Moore, an NSWCDD engineer and mentor to the students. "Understanding these properties is paramount as the Navy begins to design, develop, produce, and field components and systems produced with additive manufacturing to improve performance and availability of systems in the Fleet. Without it, much of the promise of additive manufacturing will be out of reach."


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